Fika Swedish Coffee?

Fika Swedish Coffee
A relaxing coffee and cake break – Fika is often translated as “a coffee and cake break”, which is kind of correct, but really it is much more than that. Fika is a concept, a state of mind, an attitude and an important part of Swedish culture. Many Swedes consider that it is almost essential to make time for fika every day.

  • It means making time for friends and colleagues to share a cup of coffee (or tea) and a little something to eat.
  • Fika cannot be experienced at your desk by yourself.
  • That would just be taking coffee and cake.
  • Fika is a ritual.
  • Even the mighty Volvo plant stops for fika,
  • All Swedes consider it important to make time to stop and socialise: to take a pause.

It refreshes the brain and strengthens relationships. And it makes good business sense: firms have better teams and are more productive where fika is institutionalised. Fika can be a verb. Swedes will say to each other, “Let’s go and fika !” or “You and I fika together so well”.

  • Exactly what you eat during fika is not really important.
  • The food is incidental to the companionship, the socialising and catching up with friends and colleagues.
  • But whatever food you choose for fika it should be fresh and well presented.
  • Ideally it should be homemade.
  • Many team leaders in Sweden consider it important to regularly bake something at home to take into work for fika,

Often fika is enjoyed by candlelight, even if it is in an office or the corner of a factory. It’s all about slowing down and finding time for friends and colleagues, whilst you sip a drink and enjoy something small to eat. Candlelight helps!

What is Fika?

A relaxing coffee and cake break – Fika is often translated as “a coffee and cake break”, which is kind of correct, but really it is much more than that. Fika is a concept, a state of mind, an attitude and an important part of Swedish culture. Many Swedes consider that it is almost essential to make time for fika every day.

It means making time for friends and colleagues to share a cup of coffee (or tea) and a little something to eat. Fika cannot be experienced at your desk by yourself. That would just be taking coffee and cake. Fika is a ritual. Even the mighty Volvo plant stops for fika, All Swedes consider it important to make time to stop and socialise: to take a pause.

It refreshes the brain and strengthens relationships. And it makes good business sense: firms have better teams and are more productive where fika is institutionalised. Fika can be a verb. Swedes will say to each other, “Let’s go and fika !” or “You and I fika together so well”.

Exactly what you eat during fika is not really important. The food is incidental to the companionship, the socialising and catching up with friends and colleagues. But whatever food you choose for fika it should be fresh and well presented. Ideally it should be homemade. Many team leaders in Sweden consider it important to regularly bake something at home to take into work for fika,

Often fika is enjoyed by candlelight, even if it is in an office or the corner of a factory. It’s all about slowing down and finding time for friends and colleagues, whilst you sip a drink and enjoy something small to eat. Candlelight helps!

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What is on the Swedish fika-table?

What’s on the fika-table – Essential for a fika is the cup of coffee. But, of course, not everyone likes it. To have a tea, soda or any other drink instead is just as fine. Most Swedes combine their brake with some pastry, called fikabröd, Among the most popular are kanelbullar (cinnamon buns), chokladbollar (chocolate balls) and biscuits.

How long should a Swedish fika break be?

What makes it different to a normal coffee break? – So, on paper, fika might seem like a normal coffee break – but it’s more than that. As well as being used to describe a coffee break and a ritual, fika can also be defined as a concept – the idea of slowing down and taking the time to appreciate the coffee in front of you, among other things.

  • The fika “state of mind” also encourages you to take the time to drop whatever you’re doing and appreciate the people around you while you’re taking the break.
  • It’s how we meet each other and socialise,” Christian says.
  • It could be a business meeting, it could be friends or family a cup of coffee and talking together.” Matt Mitchell is the founder of Fika Coffee Roasters in Durham in the UK.

He first discovered fika when he befriended a couple of Swedish tourists while travelling in Cambodia. After returning to the UK, he named his roastery after this Swedish tradition. “The whole idea of fika is to take that step away, and take some time for yourself to socialise,” Matt tells me.

  1. What sets fika apart is that you aren’t trying to gulp down coffee while filling out paperwork or with your eyes glued to a screen.
  2. Instead, fika allows you to break away from what you’re concentrating on to savour a moment of quality time with coffee and friends.
  3. At its core, fika is both a coffee and a social break.
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These two traits go hand-in-hand, and you can’t have one without the other – this is what makes fika unique. Fika Swedish Coffee

Why do Swedish people love Fika?

Fika at work – At many working places, fika is part of the regular daily schedule. In the morning a fika at 10:00 and in the afternoon at 15:00 is not uncommon. For you sweet little new-Swede, that means two 10 – 30 minutes-extra breaks, called fikarast or fikapaus,

  • When everyone gathers in the meeting room, you better stop working and join the group.
  • You won’t get any extra points from your boss when you pretend you have no time for a break, because your work is just too important.
  • Among the consensus-oriented Swedes, fika is a great way to exchange knowledge, opinions about what’s going on in the company, and generally bond with your colleagues.

Resulting in better productivity for the company and better wellbeing for each employee. Fika Swedish Coffee Swedes spend in total 9,5 days each year having fika

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